Jason B. Ladd

Ask the Questions. Embrace the Answers. Make the Leap.

Forfeit: When Life Coaches Choose Death

Suicide

A man and his common law wife were found dead in their apartment.  They committed suicide together.

They held hands as they breathed their last breaths.

The building manager discovered them shortly after they ended their lives.  Their occupation?  Life coaches. 

This couple’s pursuit of happiness somehow ended in self-destruction.

Something must go terribly wrong when life coaches choose death. 

The term life coach naturally points toward a sports analogy.

A coach’s purpose is to create a successful team.  A coach trains a team to win.  A life coach teaches people how to succeed in life.

This raises some important questions:

Your coach spends the entire season teaching you how to play the game. They teach you how to follow the rules.  They teach you not to cheat and how to be a good sport. life coach

They teach you never to quit. 

What would you think if in the throes of an impending victory, your coach suddenly blew the whistle and said, “We forfeit. We’re not playing anymore.”

We must be careful when we select our life coach.

The life coach industry has become popular.  One website claims life coaching is the second fastest growing industry in the country.

New York Times contributor Spencer Morgan reports that life coaching has roots reaching back to the Human Potential Movement of the 1970s.¹

USA Today Collegiate Correspondent Jennifer Guay writes,

Life coaches help their clients identify and pursue goals through a steady rotation of encouragement, brutal honesty and perspective. Coaches generally fall into two categories — personal and professional — but a growing number of niche coaches advise on anything from weight loss to empty-nest syndrome.²

A Google search for “life coach” will yield over 375,000,000 results.

life coachIf you are going to trust someone to coach you through life, it’s prudent to make sure your life coach is qualified for the job.  Here are some qualities to look for:

  • Impeccable character
  • Unmatched credentials
  • Appropriate authority
  • Trustworthiness
  • Perseverance

Have you researched your life coach?  Do they have these qualities?  How do you know?

Does your life coach have the potential to forfeit at the bottom of the ninth?

The answer is most likely, “Yes.”  Even the strongest of life coaches is subject to temptation, weakness, and fatigue.

However, there is one life coach who will always persevere.  He is known for being trustworthy.  He has ultimate authority and unmatched credentials, and His character is beyond repute.

If you’re looking for someone to lead you in the game of life, why not pick the greatest leader whoever lived?

Jesus Christ

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He is the only coach in history who turned the tragedy of death into the miracle of life for all you put their trust in Him.

The life coaches who took their own lives encouraged people to foster and encourage their own inner strengths.

Instead, lean on the strength of Jesus Christ.

The coaches encouraged people to move toward their real self.  

Instead, move toward the one who gave you a soul.  

The life coaches ended their lives because there was too much pain.

Instead, give thanks in knowing that someone loved you so much, they absorbed the punishing pain that we deserve.

Coaches sacrifice a lot for their players.

Jesus sacrificed His life for us all.

We are on the field.  He has picked His team.  He wants you.

What are you fighting for?

Related Posts

¹ Spencer Morgan, “Should a Life Coach Have a Life First?” The New York Times, January 27, 2012, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/29/fashion/should-a-life-coach-have-a-life-first.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

² Jennifer Guay, “Millenials enter growing, controversial field of life coaching,” USA Today College, January 16, 2013, http://www.usatodayeducate.com/staging/index.php/ccp/millennials-enter-growing-controversial-field-of-life-coaching

Photo Credit:  saccharainesmileCreative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 License

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Janelle Y. Chapman

Photo by Steve Jurvetson.N.grande at it.wikipedia [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

About Jason B. Ladd

Jason is an author, speaker, Marine, and father of seven. He has flown the F/A-18 Hornet as a Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1 (MAWTS-1) Instructor Pilot and the F-16 as an Instructor Pilot. His award-winning book One of the Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot’s Reconnaissance of the Christian Worldview has been optioned for film adaptation. He is represented by Julie Gwinn of The Seymour Agency.

2 Replies

  1. That’s a powerful message, Mr. Jason. Thanks so much for writing. I came here from seeing your blogger icon at Susan Irene’s blog. My salutations to you in your work for our country and for the Lord. Blessings on your life and ministry. I am touched by your writing in this post. I believe God gives us discernment, especially when choosing the right person to give us direction (ie. life coach). And we can’t go wrong with the Supreme Life Coach, Jesus Christ, The Anointed One. Thanks again for heartfelt writing.

    1. Arlen, you are too kind. I’m glad you connected with the post. Look forward to following your ministry as well!