“Thank God”: Our Cry of Relief in the Moments That Matter

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We all thank God in the moments that matter:

Singer: “Honey, I’m home. I completely blanked out through the second verse. They started boo-ing. At least my sponsors haven’t called.”

“Thank God.”

Politician: “Honey, I’m home. The bridge thing’s not going away. I’m trying to do what’s right. It’s ugly, but I think we can still make a run.”

“Thank God.”

Contractor: “Honey, I’m home. No one showed up on time today. I had to reschedule half the projects, but we are still on schedule.”

“Thank God.”

Teacher: “Honey, I’m home. The kids did not score well. I don’t know what else I can do. They say we will remain in session, for now.”

“Thank God.”

Businessman: “Honey, I’m home. We were hit hard today, but they’re saying the market should turn around. We’re okay for now.”

“Thank God.”

World Leader: “The book came out, and it’s scathing. It shouldn’t have any effect on my base. We still have plenty of support.”

“Thank God.”

IT Professional: “Honey, I’m home. We managed to recover the data. It’s going to take a lot of extra work, but we can recover.”

“Thank God.”

Doctor: “Honey, I’m home. There were major complications. He crashed twice. I’ve been awake for 30 hours. He’s stable.”

“Thank God.”

Actor: “Honey, I’m home. I didn’t get the part. They said I had no talent. My agent barely saved my reputation.”

“Thank God.”

Writer: “Honey, I’m home. They said they couldn’t market it, but they’ll take one more look.”

“Thank God.”

Lawyer: “Honey, I’m home. We lost the case, but the firm’s going to give me another shot.”

“Thank God.”

Mechanic: “Honey, I’m home. I wrecked a transmission today, but they’re covering it.”

“Thank God.”

Barista: “Honey, I’m home. Everyone was rude, but I don’t let it get to me.”

“Thank God.”

Blogger: “Honey, I’m home. I missed the deadline, but I still have a job.”

“Thank God.”

Reporter: “Honey, I’m home. They are not going to replace me.”

“Thank God.”

Trucker: “Honey, I’m home. The rig’s still holding up.”

“Thank God.”

Pastor: “Honey, I’m home. We have enough.”

“Thank God.”

Service member: “Honey, I’m home.”

“Thank God.”

The news this week was all about bridges and books. But a more meaningful event occurred which had nothing to do with traffic delays or tell-alls.

Three service members won’t be coming home again. We lost two, and one is missing after their helicopter went down off the coast of Virginia on January 8, 2014.

I pray for the families of Petty Officer 3rd Class Brian Andrew Collins, Lt Wesley Van Dorn, and Lt Sean Christopher Snyder.

It’s hard to thank God at a time like this. But even in the pain of our yesterdays, let us thank God for the people in our life today.

Life is not about jobs or things. Life is ultimately about relationships–with the people in our life, and the God who brought us all together.

To us, these three service members are gone. But perhaps they’re crying out in a new kind of relief:

“Father, I’m home.”

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Photo credit: DVIDSHUB / Foter.com / CC BY

Jason B. Ladd

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Christian, husband, father of five, and Marine fighter pilot. Seeking Peace, Waging War, Defending the Faith. What are you fighting for?
  • judithr

    I agree with this – it’s easy to thank and praise God when everything is going well, but the real test is whether you keep thanking and praising him, even when you think everything has gone wrong. Great post :)

  • Susan Irene Fox

    Jason, you always seem to know exactly what to say and how to direct us to pray. Bless you, thank God for you and for all those serving. May they all be able to say, “Honey, I’m home.”

    • http://www.jasonbladd.com/ Jason B. Ladd

      Thank you, Susan

  • http://veritasdomain.wordpress.com/ SLIMJIM

    Wow that was powerful. Prayers for the family.

  • arkenaten

    Condolences for the service personal.

    Which god would that be, do you think?

    • http://www.jasonbladd.com/ Jason B. Ladd

      I have good reason to believe it is the God of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph, whose revelation provides adequate answers to the questions of origins, meaning, morality, and destiny. This God passes the three tests for truth: logical consistency, empirical adequacy, and experiential relevance.

      • arkenaten

        The Abrahamic god, Yahweh, is likely make believe. Certainly an elaboration on a pre existing Canaanite, god. Not to mention his wife.
        Furthermore, as the Pentateuch is regarded by almost all recognized scholars to be fiction this puts Yahweh in an even worse light.
        Archaeologically, It certainly refutes any claims related to revelation and Moses, the Egyptian captivity and the Exodus.
        See Finkelstein, Herzog, Devers ( a Christian) Rabbi Wolpe to name but four.
        And as almost every non-apologetic scholar recognizes that Moses was a fictional character, how would you explain Jesus referencing him and his supposed laws?

        • http://www.jasonbladd.com Jason B. Ladd

          As you can see, it always comes back to a single question: Who do you trust? Do you trust contemporary scholars, complete with presuppositions, biases, motives, weaknesses, imperfections, and sin (as we all have), or do you trust the only person in history whose reputation has remained untarnished for thousands of years?